Accidental Injury Becomes #3 Cause of Death For The First Time in U.S. History

By Newsroom America Staff at 5:03 pm Eastern

Unintentional, preventable injuries – commonly known as "accidents" – claimed a record high 161,374 lives in 2016 to become the third leading cause of death in the United States for the first time in recorded history, according to National Safety Council data analysis.

Weather anomalies accelerate the melting of sea ice

17 Jan 15:40 | World

In the winter of 2015/16, something happened that had never before been seen on this scale: at the end of December, temperatures rose above zero degrees Celsius for several days in parts of the Arctic. As a result of this unusual warmth, the sea ice began to melt. read more »

Majority of US physicians say they're burned out or depressed

17 Jan 14:38 | U.S. News

Nearly two-thirds of U.S. physicians report feeling burned out, depressed - or both - with one in three physicians admitting that their feelings of depression have an impact on how they relate to patients and colleagues, according to the first Medscape National Report on Physician Burnout and Depression.read more »

Intensified fighting across Syria having 'devastating' impact on civilians

17 Jan 14:34 | World

Intensification in hostilities across Syria is having a “devastating” impact on civilians, agencies in the war-ravaged country said, warning that the fighting is also severely limiting life-saving humanitarian operations.read more »

Declining trust in facts, institutions imposes real-world costs on US society, report finds

16 Jan 17:07 | U.S. News

Americans' reliance on facts to discuss public issues has declined significantly in the past two decades, leading to political paralysis and collapse of civil discourse, according to a RAND Corporation report. read more »

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Want people to work together? Familiarity, ability to pick partners could be key

16 Jan 15:15 | World

The key to getting people to work together effectively could be giving them the flexibility to choose their collaborators and the comfort of working with established contacts, new research suggests.read more »

Study shows how Olympic Games affect the stock market

16 Jan 14:05 | World

New research reveals how global sports events such as the Olympic Games can affect stock market activity.read more »

Anxiety: An early indicator of Alzheimer's disease?

16 Jan 14:02 | U.S. News

A new study suggests an association between elevated amyloid beta levels and the worsening of anxiety symptoms. The findings support the hypothesis that neuropsychiatric symptoms could represent the early manifestation of Alzheimer's disease in older adults. read more »

Research suggests Trump's 'Muslim ban' produced rare shift in public opinion

15 Jan 17:02 | U.S. News

President Donald Trump signed Executive Order 13769 on Jan. 27, 2017, effectively barring individuals from seven predominately Muslim countries from entering the United States for 90 days.read more »

Experts raise concerns over raw meat diets for cats and dogs

15 Jan 15:00 | World

Experts are warning dog and cat owners to be aware of the risks associated with feeding their pets raw meat-based diets (RMBDs), instead of the more conventional dry or canned pet foods.read more »

Energy drinks can negatively impact health of youth

15 Jan 11:59 | U.S. News

Over half of Canadian youth and young adults who have consumed energy drinks have experienced negative health effects as a result, according to a study from the University of Waterloo.read more »

Jet stream changes since 1960s linked to more extreme weather

15 Jan 11:55 | World

Increased fluctuations in the path of the North Atlantic jet stream since the 1960s coincide with more extreme weather events in Europe such as heat waves, droughts, wildfires and flooding, reports a University of Arizona-led team.read more »

unk food tax is legally and administratively viable, finds new analysis

12 Jan 17:06 | U.S. News

An original analysis by researchers finds that a federal tax on junk food is both legally and administratively feasible. The article points to using an excise tax paid by junk food manufacturers, rather than a sales tax for consumers.read more »

Babies stir up clouds of bio-gunk when they crawl

12 Jan 15:07 | World

When babies crawl, their movement across floors, especially carpeted surfaces, kicks up high levels of dirt, skin cells, bacteria, pollen, and fungal spores, a new study has found.read more »

Why the Republican Party may have an advantage when it rains: Voters change their minds

12 Jan 11:05 | U.S. News

Bad weather affects U.S. voter turnout and election outcomes with past research demonstrating that the Republican Party has the advantage. A new study by researchers finds that the Republican Party's advantage when it rains may be due in part to voters changing their partisan preference that day.read more »

Evolution acceptance in children linked to aptitude, not belief

12 Jan 08:36 | World

In contrast to adults, acceptance of evolution in schoolchildren in the UK is linked to their scientific aptitude rather than conflicts with belief systems, say scientists at the Milner Centre for Evolution at the University of Bath. read more »

Ingredients for life revealed in meteorites that fell to Earth

11 Jan 17:11 | World

Two wayward space rocks, which separately crashed to Earth in 1998 after circulating in our solar system's asteroid belt for billions of years, share something else in common: the ingredients for life. They are the first meteorites found to contain both liquid water and a mix of complex organic compounds such as hydrocarbons and amino acids.read more »

Recent spikes in homicide rates don't tell whole story: study

11 Jan 15:08 | U.S. News

Recent spikes in homicide rates across the nation have been attributed to causes ranging from civil unrest to the opioid epidemic, but new UT Dallas research published in the journal Homicide Studies found a much simpler explanation: The increases follow predictable fluctuations in rates over the past 55 years.read more »

Making the Internet of Things possible with a new breed of 'memristors'

11 Jan 14:05 | World

The internet of things is coming, that much we know. But still it won't; not until we have components and chips that can handle the explosion of data that comes with IoT. In 2020, there will already be 50 billion industrial internet sensors in place all around us.read more »

Analysis finds E-cigarettes a safer option than smoking

11 Jan 14:03 | U.S. News

Quitting smoking is among the top New Year's resolutions, but is notoriously difficult to do and often requires multiple attempts and strategies.read more »

The future of grocery shopping: Faster, cheaper, smaller

10 Jan 17:10 | U.S. News

Walmart was once considered the future of grocery shopping, offering consumers a slew of discounted choices, compared to the competition.read more »

Women survive crises better than men

10 Jan 15:05 | World

Women today tend to live longer than men almost everywhere worldwide -- in some countries by more than a decade. Now, three centuries of historical records show that women don't just outlive men in normal times: They're more likely to survive even in the worst of circumstances.read more »

Jeans made with child labor? People choose willful ignorance

10 Jan 12:23 | U.S. News

Many consumers have found a way to cope with the knowledge that products they like have been made unethically: They simply forget they ever knew it.read more »

Mass extinctions remove species but not ecological variety

10 Jan 12:17 | World

Sixty-five million years ago, clouds of ash choked the skies over Earth. Dinosaurs, along with about half of all the species on Earth, staggered and died. But in the seas, a colorful population of marine bivalves--the group including oysters, clams and scallops--soldiered on, tucked into the crevices of ocean floors and shorelines.read more »

Chemists discover plausible recipe for early life on Earth

9 Jan 17:01 | World

Chemists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have developed a fascinating new theory for how life on Earth may have begun.read more »

Want to make money with stocks? Never ever listen to analysts say researchers

9 Jan 15:19 | U.S. News

Investors probably expect that following the suggestions of stock analysts would make them better off than doing the exact opposite. Nevertheless, recent research by Nicola Gennaioli and colleagues shows that the best way to gain excess-returns would be to invest in the shares least favored by analysts.read more »

Syria: 13 million people in desperate need as seventh war-torn winter sets in

9 Jan 11:17 | World

With millions of desperate people across Syria now facing their seventh winter of war, the United Nations warned on Tuesday that intensified military operations in the country's north are forcing families to flee, in the cold, to areas without enough resources to support them.read more »

Smoke from wildfires can tip air quality to unhealthy levels

9 Jan 11:15 | U.S. News

Smoke plumes emanating from wildfires are swept high up into the air and spread over thousands of kilometers even days after a fire has been put out. The fine particles and harmful ozone contained in these plumes often have devastating effects on the air quality of US cities and consequently the health of their inhabitants. read more »

Trawl of Red Sea surface waters finds little plastic

8 Jan 17:08 | World

Researchers are mapping global patterns of marine plastic pollution as alarm grows over floating rubbish. A team led by marine scientist Carlos Duarte from KAUST shows that the level of plastic debris in the Red Sea is relatively low.read more »

Twitter, Trump and sexual assault: A call to men for action

8 Jan 15:23 | U.S. News

The social media backlash against sexual assault not only gives victims a collective outlet for disclosure, but also serves as a powerful tool to urge boys and men to condemn violence against women, finds a first-of-its-kind study by Michigan State University scholars. read more »

US rivers and streams are compromised by increasing salt loads

8 Jan 15:21 | U.S. News

Human activities are exposing US rivers and streams to a cocktail of salts, with consequences for infrastructure and drinking water supplies. So reports a new study that is the first to assess the combined, long-term changes in freshwater salinity and alkalization across the country.read more »

Scientists uncover why sauna bathing is good for your health

8 Jan 15:19 | World

Over the past couple of years, scientists at the University of Eastern Finland have shown that sauna bathing is associated with a variety of health benefits.read more »

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