Study reveals new Antarctic process contributing to sea level rise and climate change

By Newsroom America Staff at 5:16 pm Eastern

A new IMAS-led study has revealed a previously undocumented process where melting glacial ice sheets change the ocean in a way that further accelerates the rate of ice melt and sea level rise.

Cities and communities in the US losing 36 million trees a year

3:35 pm Eastern | U.S. News

Scientists with the USDA Forest Service estimate that between 2009 and 2014, tree cover in the Nation's urban/community areas declined by 0.7 percent, which translates to losing an estimated 36 million trees or approximately 175,000 acres of tree cover annually.read more »

Dogs could be more similar to humans than we thought

19 Apr 12:33 | World

Dog and human gut microbiomes have more similar genes and responses to diet than we previously thought, according to a study published in the open access journal, Microbiome.read more »

People waste nearly a pound of food daily

19 Apr 10:10 | U.S. News

Americans waste nearly a pound of food per person each day, but the exact amount of food we trash differs by how healthy your diet is, a new University of Vermont co-authored national study finds.read more »

New tool to speed up the design of wearable tech

18 Apr 17:06 | World

Experts from the University of Surrey have developed a new methodology that allows designers of smart-wearables to better understand and predict how their products would perform once manufactured and in use.read more »

Drinking up to 3 cups of coffee per day may be safe, protective

18 Apr 14:02 | U.S. News

Many clinicians advise patients with atrial or ventricular arrhythmias to avoid caffeinated beverages, but recent research has shown that coffee and tea are safe and can reduce the frequency of arrhythmias, according to a review published today in JACC: Clinical Electrophysiology. read more »

Digital remains should be treated with the same care and respect as physical remains

18 Apr 12:00 | World

From live-streaming funerals to online memorial pages and even chat-bots that use people's social media footprints' to act as online ghosts, the digital afterlife industry (DAI) has become big business.read more »

Can your dog predict an earthquake? Evidence is shaky, say researchers

18 Apr 10:08 | U.S. News

For centuries people have claimed that strange behavior by their cats, dogs and even cows can predict an imminent earthquake, but the first rigorous analysis of the phenomenon concludes that there is no strong evidence behind the claim.read more »

Trust in science, news and experts is influenced by sound quality

17 Apr 17:17 | World

A new study by USC and The Australian National University shows that audio quality influences whether people believe what they hear -- and whether they trust the source of information. read more »

Army scientists uncover how to stop cyber intrusions

17 Apr 15:33 | U.S. News

U.S. Army-funded researchers at the University of California in Los Angles have found a proverbial smoking gun signature of the long sought-after Majorana particle, and the find, they say, could block intruders on sensitive communication networks.read more »

Warming climate could speed forest regrowth in eastern US

17 Apr 14:10 | U.S. News

Climate change could speed the natural regrowth of forests on undeveloped or abandoned land in the eastern U.S., according to a new study.read more »

Education, not income, the best predictor of a long life

17 Apr 14:08 | World

ising income and the subsequent improved standards of living have long been thought to be the most important factors contributing to a long and healthy life. However, new research has shown that instead, the level of education a person has is a much better predictor of life expectancy. read more »

We think we're the first advanced earthlings - but how do we really know?

16 Apr 17:20 | World

Imagine if, many millions of years ago, dinosaurs drove cars through cities of mile-high buildings. A preposterous idea, right? Over the course of tens of millions of years, however, all of the direct evidence of a civilization--its artifacts and remains--gets ground to dust. How do we really know, then, that there weren't previous industrial civilizations on Earth that rose and fell long before human beings appeared?read more »

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Are millennials taking over the supply chain?

16 Apr 14:37 | U.S. News

The way you get a cup of coffee, cook a meal at home and even purchase clothing is changing. What once was a $3 cup of coffee is now $15 with Starbucks Reserve. Meals are planned ahead of time with pre-packaged ingredients that are shipped to your doorstep by Blue Apron or Hello Fresh.read more »

Motivation for using fake Instagram (Finsta) is not to reveal inappropriate self

16 Apr 14:34 | U.S. News

As Instagram is viewed as a place for building the ideal self, some users have created fake Instagram (Finsta) accounts to buck this trend. But are these "fake" accounts really there to express the real, sometimes ugly self, or is there a deeper motivation? read more »

Evidence mounts for Alzheimer's, suicide risks among youth in polluted cities

16 Apr 14:31 | World

A University of Montana researcher and her collaborators have published a new study that reveals increased risks for Alzheimer's and suicide among children and young adults living in polluted megacities.read more »

The secret to being cool: Try smiling

13 Apr 16:26 | U.S. News

For many people, one of the unspoken rules for being cool is maintaining an emotionally inexpressive attitude. This message is reinforced through advertisements where fashion models rarely smile and by quotes from celebrities.read more »

Tsunamis could cause beach tourism to lose hundreds of millions of dollars every year

13 Apr 11:22 | World

Going to the beach this summer? European tourists are more frequently going to places all over the world with significant tsunami risk, researchers have found. read more »

Missile strikes against Syria 'as serious as triggering events,' expert says

13 Apr 08:19 | U.S. News

As the Trump administration considers military operations against Syria in the wake of a suspected chemical weapons attack Saturday (April 7) in the town of Douma, a University of Notre Dame Law School professor and world-renowned expert on international law on the use of force says a reprisal attack would be illegal.read more »

Digital addiction increases loneliness, anxiety and depression

12 Apr 17:14 | U.S. News

Smartphones are an integral part of most people's lives, allowing us to stay connected and in-the-know at all times. The downside of that convenience is that many of us are also addicted to the constant pings, chimes, vibrations and other alerts from our devices, unable to ignore new emails, texts and images.read more »

RAND identifies new strategies for countering Russian social media

12 Apr 15:12 | World

A new RAND Corporation report finds that Russia is waging a social media campaign in the Baltics, Ukraine and nearby states to sow dissent against neighboring governments, as well as NATO and the European Union.read more »

After tax, Philadelphians 40 percent less likely to drink soda every day

12 Apr 12:10 | U.S. News

Almost immediately after the "soda tax" went into place, Philadelphians were 40 percent less likely to drink soda every day, a new Drexel University study found.read more »

Night owls have higher risk of dying sooner

12 Apr 10:06 | World

"Night owls" -- people who like to stay up late and have trouble dragging themselves out of bed in the morning -- have a higher risk of dying sooner than "larks," people who have a natural preference for going to bed early and rise with the sun, according to a new study.read more »

Melting of Arctic mountain glaciers unprecedented in the past 400 years

11 Apr 17:20 | World

Glaciers in Alaska's Denali National Park are melting faster than at any time in the past four centuries because of rising summer temperatures, a new study finds.read more »

The emotions we feel may shape what we see

11 Apr 15:18 | U.S. News

Our emotional state in a given moment may influence what we see, according to findings published in Psychological Science. In two experiments, researchers found that participants saw a neutral face as smiling more when it was paired with an unseen positive image.read more »

Hotter, longer, more frequent -- marine heatwaves on the rise

11 Apr 12:13 | World

An international study reveals globally marine heatwaves have increased over the past century in number, length and intensity as a direct result of warming oceans.read more »

US public companies have increasingly shorter lifespans, IU research says

11 Apr 10:04 | U.S. News

At a time when more Americans are living longer, the companies where many people spend their working lives have increasingly shorter lifespans, according to research from Indiana University's Kelley School of Business.read more »

Move over fake news: Hostile neighbors pose big threats to governance

10 Apr 17:13 | U.S. News

Propaganda by way of "fake news" is one way a nation can wage war without firing a single shot. Another is through tactics of subversion and coercion, in which a country intentionally keeps neighboring countries weak in order to advance its own foreign policy interests, according to a new study published by Princeton University.read more »

Later school start times really do improve sleep time

10 Apr 15:01 | World

A new study in SLEEP indicates that delaying school start times results in students getting more sleep, and feeling better, even within societies where trading sleep for academic success is common.read more »

Who are the best gift-givers? Not who you'd think, says marketing research

10 Apr 12:08 | World

Have you ever bought a gift for a friend, simply because it's a gift that you would like yourself? If so, that was likely a time that you projected your own attitudes onto your friend, assuming your friend shared your preferences. Such activity is called "social projection." read more »

Toxins produced by e-cigarettes vary by flavor

10 Apr 10:14 | U.S. News

The flavor of an e-cigarette may affect more than a consumer's taste buds, according to Penn State researchers who say the chemicals that make up different flavors also produce different levels of free radicals, toxins often associated with cancer and other diseases.read more »

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